A Sultry Bumper for a Sultry Show

In the midst of the first radio show week, I tried to focus my audio assignments on prompts that would contribute to our show idea. Therefore, the first assignment I decided to complete was the “Create a DS106 Radio Bumper”. This would be round two for me with this assignment, as I created one during audio week. However, this time I concentrated on the concept of the Femme Fatale, using sultry music and seductive language. The specific prompt states:

Now that we have a #ds106 radio up and running creating a 15 to 30 second bumper for the station. What is a bumper? It is a short recording that identifies the radio station with signature music or an expression that makes sure the listeners know what they are tuned into (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumper_(broadcasting)). So for ds106 it should certainly include “DS106 Radio” and some sort of message about the station with voice over music.

This assignment is worth 2.5 points.

Considering that our radio show will be set in modern times, with neo-noir Femme Fatales, I searched for more recent sounding background music than classic noir. This search took the most amount of time because I could not seem to find exactly what I wanted, in order to portray sexy and dark at the same time. However, I finally found a mix of instrumental blues music that had the perfect beginning for my thirty-second bumper. The next step was fabricating a message to tie in the seductive nature of the Femme Fatale with an announcement of “DS106 Radio”. I channeled Sandy from “Grease”, as she delivered her famous line, “tell me about it…stud”, when voicing the message, “Hey there ladies and gents, you’re listening to DS106 radio”.  I tried my hand at a raspy and sexy voice. Don’t judge too harshly! :) Although this bumper specifically applies to our show about the “maNOIRpulators”, it also applies in general to the DS106 noir style, as Femme Fatales are a typical noir trope. I utilized Audacity to put the clips together, importing the music track and cutting the section after 30 seconds elapsed, and then recorded a voice-over for the message. I placed the message in the middle of the bumper at about the 15-second mark and used the Amplify effect to lower the music volume in the background as it played. My final touch was fading out the music at the end to avoid an abrupt ending. I did not think I could like a bumper more than my first , but this one might take the cake! :)

This Bumper is Bumpin’!

Granted, I have probably heard thousands of radio bumpers in my lifetime from many different radio stations, I was oblivious to their official name, as well as, the process involved with making one. When tasked with creating a bumper for DS106 radio, the prompt states:

Now that we have a #ds106 radio up and running creating a 15 to 30 second bumper for the station. What is a bumper? It is a short recording that identifies the radio station with signature music or an expression that makes sure the listeners know what they are tuned into (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumper_(broadcasting)). So for ds106 it should certainly include “DS106 Radio” and some sort of message about the station with voice over music.

This assignment is worth 2.5 points.

Upon further research of radio bumpers, I found that the two main things that one should focus on are the background music and the message. I searched for noir music and found the perfect track, because it begins with rain pelting in the background, a classic noir trope, and then continues to create a sense of suspicion and tension. It even has a brief section that almost mutes the music, which proved ideal for adding my voice-over message. Once I cut the track to about 28 seconds, it was time to fabricate what I was going to say. This thought process took longer than finding the music, because I wanted it to represent the noir theme in a catchy way, while also relaying the required “DS106 Radio” announcement. When listening to examples on other stations, as well as those made by my peers, I discovered that most say something along the lines of “stay right there, you are listening to so-and-so’s radio”. I kept thinking, “stay right there, stay right there, stay right there”, and then I thought,”freeze”, which is perfect! It is a catchy word that demands attention and is used often by classic hard-boiled detectives. “Freeze! You’re listening to DS106 Radio” is my bumpin’ bumper. I have yet to hear it play on the station, but am excited for my peers to do so, because I think it truly conveys the noir theme and delivers the appropriate message!